François’ Response to the Greenspace Alliance Municipal Election Survey

Learn more about the Greenspace Alliance and the good work they do preserving and protecting our greenspaces here:  http://greenspace-alliance.ca/. Here is my response to their survey:

1. How important is green space for residents of your ward?
Extremely important

1a. What do you believe is the greatest threat to greenspace in your ward?
Housing developments

2a. Are you aware of the City of Ottawa’s Urban Forest Management Plan?
Moderately Aware

2b. Funding of the UMFP has only been approved by council for the first year. If elected, will you support the funding of years two, three, and four of the Urban Forest Management Plan?
Yes

2c. How important is the Urban Forest Management Plan to you as an elected official?
Extremely important

3a. Are you aware of the City of Ottawa’s Site Alteration By-law?
Somewhat aware

3b. The by-law will come back to council in two years to assess how well it has been working .The current method of enforcement is a complaint based system. The City of Ottawa is the only municipality in Ontario with a Site Alteration by-law that does not include a permit based system. As an elected official, would you consider moving from a complaint based system (after the fact) to a permit based system (in advance)?
Yes

3c. How important is having a Site Alteration By-law to you as an elected official?
Very important

4a. Are you aware of the City of Ottawa’s Significant Woodland Policy?
Somewhat aware

4b. This policy (OPA 179) is under appeal and may return to council for consideration in 2019. As an elected official will you support the approval of the current Significant Woodland Policy?
Yes

4c. How important is having a Significant Woodland Policy to you as an elected official?
Very important

5a. Are you aware of these Tree Conservation By- laws?
Somewhat aware

i. Extend the protection to trees of 20 cm in diameter, down from 30 cm?
Yes

ii. Expand the definition of Distinctive Trees?
Yes

iii. Significantly increase the penalties for breaching the bylaw?
Yes

5b. How important are the two Urban Tree
Conservation By-laws to you as an elected official?
Very important

6a. Are you aware of the Greenspace Master Plan?
Somewhat aware

6b. The Official Plan will be reviewed during the next term of Council, including the Greenspace Master Plan, which has not been updated since 2003. As an elected official, would you support these greenspace objectives set out in the Greenspace Master Plan and Official Plan?
Yes

6c. How important is the Greenspace Master Plan to you as an elected official?
Extremely important

6d. Every review of the official plan addresses expanding the urban boundary, which results in the loss of rural green space. As an elected official, what is your opinion of urban expansion? Are you more likely to support intensifying within the urban boundary or expanding into rural Ottawa? Please explain. 
Not likely. We need to be very careful when considering the expansion of the urban boundary. We need to decide now on a balance to achieve and to ensure that balance is respected.

7a. Are you aware of the Chalk River nuclear waste disposal plan?
Somewhat aware

7b. In April 2018, mayors in the Montreal Metropolitan Community (CMM) unanimously opposed the proposal to build the permanent nuclear waste disposal site in Chalk River, Ontario. As an elected official, would you support a Council declaration opposing to the Chalk River nuclear waste disposal plan?
Yes

8. Do you have any other thoughts or comments about greenspace in Ottawa?
We need to do more. We need to elect Councillors that will stand-up for the environment and not be more concerned with their re- election in 4 years. The green space will always outlast the four year mandates. When the green spaces are gone, they usually are gone forever…

Compare François with the other candidates

Friends and neighbours of Innes ward, you are hiring your next City Councillor. You need to choose the right person for the job.

City Councillor for Innes Ward is a very important job that involves community consultation, detailed long term planning and the careful stewardship of Ottawa’s $3.4 billion dollar budget, as well as dealing with day-to-day issues in the ward. To read more about the job description click here.

Now let’s look at the qualifications and experience. Which candidate has the most experience, most relevant education and best leadership track record, while remaining heavily involved in the local community?

These responses were provided by each candidate in a Sept 4th CBC Ottawa News survey. To view the complete article and survey responses click here.

Q. Tell us about any formal education, training or other credentials you think are relevant to the job of being a councillor. (Limit answer to 150 words.)

François Trépanier Leith-Gudbranson Dudas Lynch
1. Undergraduate degree in Political Sciences, with a minor in Canadian Studies. (1999)

2. Master in Public Administration (Management). (2004)

3. Master in Education (Adult Education). (2012)

4. Over 20 years of managerial experience.

5. 28 years of service in the Canadian Armed Forces.

6. In my last job in uniform, I managed the NCR portion of the Canadian Forces Language School, where I had a staff of over 50 employees, mixed between military, public servant, unionized and non-unionized and contractors, in addition to a $4.3 Million budget. Never went over my spending allowance! Managing such a diverse staff helped me develop extraordinary negotiating skills.

7. Successful entrepreneur for the last three years, since retiring from the Canadian Armed Forces.

8. Actively involved in the community through several organization: BCA, 51 Air Cadet Squadron, Vintage Stock Theatre, The Rotary Club of Orléans.

• BA in translation from the University of Ottawa

• Worked in Councillor Rainer Bloess’ office from 2003-2009 (planning & policy, constituency issues, budget)

• President, School Council, École élémentaire publique Le Prélude (10 years; 2000-2010

• President, Chapel Hill South Community Association (last 3 years); Vice-president, 7 years before that
Board member, Friends of Mer Bleue (last 3 years)

• Co-chair, Regional Fundraising Committee, Canadian Blood Services’ National Public Cord Blood Bank

• I have been President of the Blackburn Community Association for the past 8 years, and active on the board for 10 years. In that time, I have chaired multiple volunteer boards, organized large-scale events, raised funds for local causes, and organized many public consultations.
• As a community advocate, I have worked to build strong relationships with Orléans’ community associations and groups, collaborating with them to get results on issues that are important to east end residents.
• I have been a member of the Orléans Chamber of Commerce and an active supporter of the Heart of Orléans Business Improvement Association.
• Professionally, I have been a City of Ottawa employee for 7 years, providing strategic communications on a wide variety of projects and issues, including ones that directly benefitted Innes Ward and the east end. Prior to that, I worked as a journalist for several daily newspapers, which also gave me a keen sense of what people care about where they live.
Since my unpaid leave of absence to run for City Council, I worked in the Innes Ward office as the Director of Community Relations during this term of council. This position afforded me with the opportunity to interact with residents and senior staff at the City of Ottawa regularly on issues such as transportation and development. I worked closely with the five community associations, planned many community events, and attended countless Committee and Council meetings. I am aware of every development file in Innes Ward. If elected there will be no learning curve for me, I would be ready to continue to work for the residents of Innes Ward on Day 1. I was also a longtime community volunteer with the Blackburn Stingers and I was on the Parent Council at Good Shepherd School.

To learn more about François’ qualifications click here.

 

François’ Response to the Bike Ottawa’s Municipal Candidates Survey

Bike Ottawa 2018 logo
Learn more about Bike Ottawa and the good work that they do here: https://bikeottawa.ca/. Here is my response to their survey:
Can you ride a bicycle? *

Do you ride a bike, even if it is a few times a year?
 Yes
 No

Do you see bicycling MOSTLY as: *





Are you currently satisfied with the cycling infrastructure in Ottawa?
 Yes
 It’s okay, but could be better
 No
 I have no opinion about the cycling infrastructure in Ottawa

In your opinion, does your community generally have safe, convenient and sufficient walking and cycling access to outdoor spaces such as waterfront, parks, and multi-use trails *
 Yes
 Somewhat, but it could be better
 No
 I don’t know yet

In your opinion, does your community generally have safe, convenient and sufficient walking and cycling access to grocery stores, libraries, daycare, restaurants, medical services etc? *
 Yes
 Somewhat, but it could be better
 No
 I don’t know yet

Do you think that plowing a network of walking and cycling paths will help promote walking and cycling in winter? (FYI, plowing the current 40 km of the cycling network cost $200,000 on a total street/sidewalk/bike route plowing budget of approx. $100,000,000 annually)? *Captionless Image Yes
 No
 I don’t know yet

What do you hear is the biggest transportation concern in the ward? (Open ended question; this could be anything, from lack of sidewalks to slow transit to speeding to traffic jams) *
Vehicle speed. This is the # 1 concern on every street where we have been door knocking.

The enormous success of the Adawe bridge (more than 1.5 million bike and walk trips in the first two years) and the Corktown bridge has proven that people appreciate having infrastructure that separates walking and cycling from automobiles. What is one thing your own ward needs to improve for people who walk and bike? *
Connecting the bike lanes to each other within the wards and to other wards. Also provide protected bike lanes.

Do you support that roads and intersections should be built with safety for all users in mind: pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and transit riders of all ages and abilities (called complete streets)? *
 Yes
 No

Would you support safe cycling access to all LRT stations, via separate or protected cycling tracks so that people within a 10 minute ride of the station can cycle to LRT stations safely by bike on protected routes, and thereby avoiding large car parking lots at stations? (photo shows bike racks at new Blair LRT station) *Captionless Image Yes
 No

Are you committed to helping the city increase walking and cycling as a way of transportation to promote personal health, reduce road costs, and lower greenhouse gas emissions, with the goal of making the nation’s capital a champion and leader in this field? *
 Yes
 No

Do you support dedicating permanent and increased funding for cycling infrastructure? *
 Yes
 No

The city has a hierarchy for transportation. Walking and cycling are the most desirable to encourage, then public transportation and lastly car transportation, as it is expensive to build, environmentally unsustainable, and damaging to public health. Should the city direct more funding to active transportation infrastructure (walking, cycling, and public transit)? * yes, meaningfully increase spending on non-motorized transportation
 no, maintain approximately the current budget amounts

Do you think the city’s goals for cycling and walking infrastructure are achievable? Or perhaps not? Why? *
Yes, with proper project management and planning. Let’s invest initially where we will get the best return on investment (ROI). Let’s do it smartly, once and really for all, cyclist and pedestrians alike!

Are you willing to advocate to the province to find a new source of funding for the cancelled Ontario Municipal Commuter Cycling Program funding (or to earmark new funding), to support CycleON 2.0 (the provincial cycling plan from a few years ago, which includes new cycling education programs)? *
 Yes
 No

The risk that someone dies in a collision with a car which goes 30 km/hr is very low. Do you support 30 km/h on residential streets for increased safety in our streets? *Captionless Image Yes
 No

Do you welcome automated speed enforcement near schools and community safety zones to improve safety, especially for our children and the elderly? *
 Yes
 No

Thank you for your participation. We will publish your answers online on our website so that voters can make informed decisions. Anything you like to add?
I also promote rumble strips on roads when entering school zones. Maybe we should also consider them in high bicycle traffic areas…? With regards to the 30km/hr speed limit in residential streets, we are having enough of a hard time to have 40 km/hr respected… 30 km/hr would be quite the challenge!

Ecology Ottawa Survey of Innes Ward Candidates

Ecology Ottawa, creating a city-wide movement for the environment

Ecology Ottawa has published the responses from their all-candidates survey on environmental issues affecting our Ward and our City.

Link to survey responses: https://ecologyottawa.ca/2018/08/16/municipal-election-2018-candidates-complete-responses/#Ward2

Some of François’ thoughtful and detailed responses highlighted below:

If elected, what steps will you take to make Ottawa a leader on environmental issues during the next term of council?

François Trépanier: I will continue to promote and support environmental initiatives, much as I do in my daily life and as you can see on my platform. We need to consider electric busses for OC Transpo, safer protected bike and pedestrian lanes and continue to consider environmental impacts and solutions to every city projects.

If elected, will you commit to prioritizing pedestrian, cycling, and affordable public transit infrastructure over automobile infrastructure in meeting the future growth in travel demand in your ward?

Francois Trepanier: YES. These elements of safe cycling and safe pedestrian pathways are part of my current platform, along with improved public transit and the reduction of automobile traffic, through the creation of employment in East Ottawa.